2021 Data Viz Competition

Watch the finalists present their winning entries! Watch the Award Ceremony here.

1st Place - Judit Bekker

Fire Walk with Me

2nd Place - Anjushree Shankar

LEPROSY, India's Hidden Plague!

3rd Place - Oana Tudorancea & Nicole Klassen

Women in Government Worldwide

Top 5 Finalists

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About this Entry

Gender equality and female representation is important to both of us. We decided to use this platform to help inform why it’s important to have women leaders in national governments, some of the challenges toward the path to gender parity, and provide resources for those who want to support and learn more about these efforts. Our visualization illustrates the gender parity problem in national governments, the barriers and facilitators to increasing the number of women in government, and how the quality of life for all citizens, especially women, can improve as the number of women in national governments increases. We utilized research from the UN Women and Council on Foreign Relations to select the metrics to tell the story. We pulled data from the World Bank, Alteryx to clean and prep the data, and Tableau to visualize our story. We chose to use data from 2018-2019 because that was the most complete data year in the World Bank for the metrics selected. Because data from the World Bank are mainly percentages, our design focuses around trends in countries that have greater than or less that 30% women, rather than overall averages, to avoid the “average of averages” problem.

Author

Oana Tudorancea and Nicole Klassen

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About this Entry

This project has started with one visualization and turned into a full-scale visual storytelling that illustrates activism and political violence against women during the COVID-19 Pandemic Burst. Just think, for every news headline you read, there are hundreds of daily attacks on women that go unreported. What was really happening during COVID-19? Can it be visualized to raise empathy and awareness?Our research is based on the ACLED database {curated data about political activities and violence around the world} and our own tracked stories. It combines different visualizations, like comparison charts, a Sanaky diagram, a cluster dendrogram, and a’ flowers’ map. Each has been designed uniquely, but derived from one visual language of predefined structural elements (as line, shape, color scheme, form, proportion) and principles (as balance, unity, emphasis, white space) to communicate this sensitive data. For example, “Hair me out!” has started from a simple draft of a Sankey diagram, displaying events during the “COVID-19 Pandemic Burst”, but as I worked more with it, the bands of data transformed in my mind into strands of hair belonging to the women’s hidden stories behind that data.

The insights that are revealed demonstrate both uplifting and alarming trends in political protests and violence. The world kept turning and violence did not cease despite this pandemic.

Author

Inbal Rief

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About this Entry

My data visualisation is about the gun epidemic in the US with a specific focus on police brutality and how the African American community are disproportionately affected.

Author

Soha elghany

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About this Entry

The visualization I present is about a long forgotten disease LEPROSY- a disease that WHO has declared the world to be free of. However, India still suffers remarkably from leprosy with continuous transmission & has been at the top position more than decades. My main focus is to get an awareness among people about the disease & to enable them to rethink the measures taken to declare the world to be leprosy free.

I focus on a longform dashboard to present my narrative in parts:

Firstly, I present the global overview to emphasize how concentrated the disease is in India and has been for over 20 years. I use the technique of combining map & bump chart to highlight both issues together. My technique can be referred in this blog. I depict the causes for the issue with a multiple layer Sankey funnel graph to visually represent the magnitude of each cause affecting the leprosy transmission. Have utilized scatter plots to highlight the positions India holds. Various reasons rule for different states to have the highest no of cases & I chose to highlight those sections & the reasons for them. You could choose to highlight the leprosy centers to see the distribution of centers along with the density of cases. Lastly, I provide a timeline of measures taken by the government to bring a change.

I want to emphasize that a world is leprosy free not with just ELIMINATION but it has to be with ERADICATION.

Author

Anjushree Shankar

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About this Entry

My superpower is never being bored. I have tons of hobbies: I’m a heavy reader, I like riding my bike, cooking, listening to podcasts, but I probably spend the most time watching series. Last year this added up to 645 hours of content, that is 27 whole days. By looking at this number, I was half proud – half ashamed, but let me tell you, it was a damn fine year!

Prepare to be disappointed: I haven’t scraped the data but logged everything I watched each day to a spreadsheet. At the end of the year, I double-checked the Rotten Tomato and IMDB scores if they changed. I was anxious all the time that I might have forgotten to make a note of something that would ruin my whole project, but I managed to follow through. This was one of my hardest ideas to execute, and I’m 100% sure I wouldn’t do it again. If I’d get paid for the hours I spent building the dataset, drinks would be on me. I still have PTSD when I’m watching something and realizing this should have been logged.

For the visualization I used Tableau and Adobe Illustrator with a 4 component layering technique.

Author

Judit Bekkar

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2020 Data Viz Competition

In 2020, the top 5 finalists presented their entries in the Virtual Data Gallery. Watch the recording here.

1st Place - Kinsey Miller

Coffee Calculator

2nd Place - Kimly Scott

Coming to Australia

3rd Place - Meera Umasankar

Refugee Migration

Top 5 Finalists

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About this Entry

As an avid coffee drinker who cares about her health, I have personally struggled to find an online resource that allows me to quickly and dynamically view the nutritional information associated with my favorite beverages. Using data from public sources that I manually aggregated, I decided to put together a nutritional calculator that would enable the end-user to learn about a variety of beverages (including the ability to modify size and milk options) to inform healthy, caffeinated choices.

The star of the show (and the component that required the most data gathering, scrubbing, formatting, and validating) is the nutritional facts calculator that is cleverly disguised as a nutritional label. This is a dynamic tool that enables customization and empowers the user to explore the data as he or she customizes and compares a large variety of orders.
My hypothesis is that end-users will be most surprised and enlightened by the following:
– ounce per ounce, brewed coffee is more caffeinated than standard espresso beverages (i.e., Americanos, Lattes, Cappuccinos)
– for comparable beverages, those made with blonde-roasted beans are more caffeinated than those made with dark-roasted beans
– while Nonfat Milk serves up the lowest fat content for a 16 ounce Latte, Almond Milk is most favorable when it comes to minimizing sugar and overall calorie content

I hope you find the dashboard informative and transparent. Cheers!

Author

Kinsey Miller

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About this Entry

“My visualisation titled ‘Coming to Australia’ looks at refugee resettlement in Australia and how it compares to the rest of the world.Here, I wanted to highlight the global refugee crisis. At the end of 2018, there were over 25 million refugees worldwide, but less than 0.4% of the total refugee population had been resettled in another country. The majority of refugees are fleeing from war, conflict, violence and persecution.

Drawing on my family’s own experience as refugees resettling in Australia, I wanted to show the challenges and struggles refugees face when they flee their home country. Challenges such as language barriers, physical and mental health and racism and discrimination. By sharing my own personal story, I wanted to remind people that behind the data and the numbers, there are real people with real lives who matter.

The visualisation is built in Tableau to allow for interaction and exploration. I wanted the design to be clean and minimalist as to not detract from the important and often sensitive topic.

Author

Kimly Scott

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About this Entry

This Data Studio Dashboard explains the impact of ITP (Intelligent Tracking Prevention) on data in Google Analytics. It’s made for online marketeers, who had troubles understanding the subject because of the technical and theoretical aspects to it. The goal of this dashboard was to make ITP clear and accessible for marketeers. To do so, I made three design choices:

1. The dashboard has the look-and-feel of an online article. That’s why the design is very clean and white, and why it combines data with informative paragraphs and infographics.

2. The dashboard is a story. Many dashboards show a lot of data at once without any hierarchy. This makes it hard for the viewer to see what is really important. This dashboard does the opposite: it takes viewers through the subject step-by-step. In the end, they know exactly what ITP might mean for their data.

3. The dashboard is personal. Many articles about ITP remained on a theoretical and general level. With this dashboard I wanted to show directly what ITP means for THEIR data. That’s why viewers can select their own Google Analytics data view on top.

Next to the dashboard, I also wrote an actual article that supports and promotes the dashboard. Even today, 2 months after the release of the dashboard, many people still view the dashboard on a daily basis.

Link to article

Author

Marieke Pots

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The global refugee population reached a record high of 25.9 million in 2018. In this visualisation, users can explore where refugees mostly come from over the past decade and also where they usually seek asylum seeking safety, as a result of war, genocide and persecution. The visualisation also allows the user to explore where refugees resettle to start their new life and how host countries allowed refugees into their countries over the past decade.

Author

Hesham Eissa

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The Tableau visualisation here shows the movement of refugees from various countries around the world to the US. The visuals here shows the trend, where the refugees were from, where did they settle in and which religion they belong to. The migration trend as of 2018 is on the decrease because of Trump’s presidency & his resettlement program. Burma ranks the top from where the people migrate. Texas ranks top on welcoming the refugees to their state. And of course, Muslims are not accepted like before due to Trump’s presidency & his rules. The call to action button below on the visualisation navigates to the UN refugees website so that the users can contribute or help the refugees with whatever they can.

Author

Meera Umasankar

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